Schedules {the Adult Schedule}

Categories: Resources | Schedules

So you thought you were all done once you whipped up your student schedule, didn’t you? Yea right. Now it’s time to make a schedule for the adults in your room. This is a commonly forgotten component of scheduling that is SO important. It is critical because this should be part of your management process for your paraprofessionals. Having a clear and detailed daily schedule for your paraprofessionals will clarify expectations, provide structure, and hold everyone accountable.

I get loads of emails about staff management – which yes – is part of our job. Like it or not, it is your job to manage the staff in your room. Providing them a concrete and straightforward schedule will get rid of any grey area and they will know exactly what is expected of them. Now – making sure they do is a whole other issue, but at least you are headed in the right direction.

Off of my soapbox – I hope I have sold you all on the important of having just as detailed of an adult schedule for yourself and the paraprofessionals in your room. The adult schedule should contain:

  • which student the adult is working with
  • where the adult should be with the student.

The actual work to be done would be detailed at the actual station. But providing the simple who and where prompts are critically helpful for all adults in your classroom. Once you make this schedule, obviously give it your paraprofessionals but also post it! This helps remind everyone on a daily basis.

The Autism Helper - Schedule

 

Here is my adult-schedule-1213from last year. Again – I use excel and break it down by the 15 minutes.

The Autism Helper - Schedule

Do you have dedicated paraprofessionals in your classroom? I just received a new dedicated paraprofessional for one of my students last spring and will be getting another in the fall. Check out this post to see how I organized the schedule for her:

The Autism Helper - Schedules

I also include a detailed schedule. It’s mostly major bullet points, kind of a translation of the main schedule. I think it’s important to include the most important comments and notes written down somewhere – not just told verbally.  (more details on this in the post linked above!)

The Autism Helper - Schedule

13 Comments

  1. I’m glad I’m not the only one who makes such detailed schedules. My principal likes to tell people I run my classroom like a ship. When you have 5-8 non or semi verbal little behavior filled lovelies whom you need to teach, it’s a must. I have a whole new set of much higher kids next year, so I’m loving your summer series as I re think things for my new kiddos.

    Reply
  2. I love that you brought up structure for the staff in your room. I am going to start my first year of teaching a self-contained life skills high school class in the fall. What exactly do you go over during your initial meeting with your staff before school starts? During my meeting, I would like to make my expectations clear but I don’t want to come across as overbearing. I would love your help! Your blog is an amazing resource. Thank you!

    Reply
  3. Yes – I love it! It is totally like running a ship! It has to be, right!?

    Reply
  4. I think using the schedule is a great way to clarify expectations – because it doesn’t come across as you telling them what to do rather you “showing” the schedule. But it gets your point across. I would go big on LOADS of positive reinforcement and praise for your staff the first week and nip any behaviors you don’t like right away. It’s easier to say it the first week or the first time rather than trying to say a month in.

    Reply
  5. Sasha. After I finish creating the student schedule I saw your post and immediately began working on the Staff-Zoning. I think one of my biggest mistakes last year was not to have an adult schedule. Your blog has been a great help.

    Keep them coming!!

    Andrea

    Reply
  6. SO great to hear Andrea! I hope the adult schedule is helpful next year 🙂

    Reply
  7. I have taught sped for 10 yrs. and the hardest part for me has ALWAYS been management of the paras. I did a schedule last year for them and will somehow tactfully add positive energy/attitude to the schedule this year. I will take all the help I can get! Thanks for this blog!

    Reply
  8. Thank you for reading! Staff management is the hardest!

    Reply
  9. Wowww! I’m going to have to do something like that… I can’t imagine creating a schedule. There will definitely be consequences by my paras

    Reply
  10. It is a must have!

    Reply
  11. I would have lost my mind if I had not used a schedule in my Resource Room classroom! Now I am moving into a high school self contained room and yours look PERFECT! I will be downloading and using these really soon!

    Reply
  12. Thanks for reading 🙂

    Reply
  13. Good luck in your new position!

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.