Vocational Job Series Part 1: Stocking How-To and Freebie

Categories: Life Skills

Last month, I shared several vocational jobs I implemented in my classroom (check out my blog on Vocational Jobs in the classroom here).  In this three-part series, I am breaking those tasks down for easy implementation in your classroom.  Today, we will focus on stocking tasks, different ways to create the task, and supplies needed to put these tasks together.

Supplies Needed for Stocking Tasks 

  • 3M small hooks
  • Lamination 
  • Wall, peg board, or bulletin board
  • Visuals for stocking 

Grab this freebie from Breezy Special Ed for the toothbrush, seed packet, gift card, and pen visuals.

Stocking Vending Machine Drinks, Candy, and Chips

Put one of each item on a hook and the rest in a basket.  The student can “stock” the vending machine items in the correct place.

Place all vending machine items on the hooks and create an order form.  Write a specific number next to each item on each order form and have the student fill the orders.  You can also level this by having order forms with pictures of the items or words.  

 

Stocking Toothbrushes, Seed Packets, Gift Cards, and Pens

Like with the vending machine items, students can stock the toothbrushes, seed packets, gift cards, and pens the same way or create order forms for students to fill the orders.  To make the task easier for a student, only put out a few items to be stocked rather than all.  

Stocking Grocery Items

Supplies Needed for Stocking Groceries

  • Empty food cans or boxes
  • Bookcase, countertop, cabinet, or desk
  • Visuals/labels for food items

Here is a great way to reuse empty food cans or boxes from home.  Find a space in your classroom, whether a bookcase, countertop, cabinet, or desk, and create a grocery aisle where students can stock the grocery items on the shelf.  Get a basket, box, or container and place a few items for the student to place on the correct shelf.  Don’t forget to add labels/price tags for each item, like at the grocery store.  

Students can also find the grocery items from a “grocery list.”  Make this into two levels by having one that is just pictures and one with words.

Another way to utilize this setup would be to have the students have a list of items to find and determine the next dollar amount.  This can easily be created for different levels as well.  

 

17 Comments

  1. What size is the first white pegboard?

    Reply
    • The large pegboard is 44 inches x 20 inches. The smaller pegboard is 14 inches x 14 inches.

      Reply
  2. Where can I find the files for the drinks and chips to print?

    Reply
    • Ashley (the blogger) made that activity and since they are name-brand products, it would be illegal to sell the photos, sorry!

      Reply
  3. Hi! Love this activity! Thank you for sharing!

    I’m wondering about the cans; are they unopened, or do you open and drain the food from each can? If cans are empty, how do you protect from sharp edges? I have been pondering the issue with how to fix the sharp edges on cans for stocking purposes for several years….have tried a few things, but, so far, they have been less than ideal.

    My other question is how or where do you make the barcoded labels?

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Thank you! The cans are empty and were reattached with glue. I didn’t have any issues with sharp edges, but you could do unopened cans.

      As for the barcoded labels, I created them myself on board maker.

      Reply
    • If you purchase a Tupperware or Pampered Chef can opener… the lid removes without any sharp edges. You can run your finger around the rim and you won’t get cut.

      Reply
      • Thanks for sharing!

        Reply
  4. was wondering how to get the vending machine stocking printouts. would really love to start this in my classroom.

    Reply
    • Ashley (the blogger) made that activity and since they are name-brand products, it would be illegal to sell the photos, sorry!

      Reply
  5. Such awesome ideas, gosh, thank you for sharing!!

    Reply
    • Thanks for reading 🙂

      Reply
  6. How do I purchase this vocational job series? I have looked all over the shop and can’t figure out which package this series is in.

    Reply
  7. How do I get a copy of the chips, pop and candy bars? We used them in my transition classroom 4 years ago and my kids would really love to sort them. Suggestions?

    Thank you.

    Reply
    • Ashley (the blogger) made that activity and since they are name-brand products, it would be illegal to sell the photos, sorry!

      Reply
  8. Do you have any steps or data sheet that you could share?

    Reply

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