Switching Out & Storing Daily Work

Part of my students’ daily morning journal page is completing an independent sort. I love sorts. Like super love sorts. Let me count the reasons: one – super easy to set up; two – requires no velcro to set up; three – you can store the whole sort in a baggie so is super space efficient; four – it’s a little more hands on than just a worksheet; five – it’s like an advanced version of file folder activities. Are you sold yet? Some of my favorite sorts are seasonal math puzzles, initial consonant word sorts, sentence building reading centers, math sorts for early childhood, synonym snapshots, froggy fill ins, and parts of speech word sorts.

We store all of our word sorts in this hanging file folder pocket. I have one section for each student so I can individualize which sorts each student is getting.

The Autism Helper - Daily Sorts

The Autism Helper - Daily Sorts

I needed a simple way to organize and store all of my sorts. We have tons and I want to make sure the right students are getting the right ones! I store all of my sorts in small baskets. I leveled them by putting them in order of difficulty.

The Autism Helper - Daily Sorts

I made a cheat sheet for which students are getting which sorts each day. I assign this as a morning job for one of my students. Each week I switch up which students are assigned which level of centers based on individual needs. Whoever’s job it is takes out a sort and puts in a new one. This saves me so much time and hassle! I would forget to switch them out half the time and then my poor students are stuck doing the same task each day. For things like this – assign a student! It helps teach independence and gives them a meaningful daily job!

The Autism Helper - Daily Sorts

Sorts are stored on a shelf so students can easily switch them out each morning!

The Autism Helper - Daily Sorts

4 Comments

  1. Great idea! I think I will use this next year! I have some of your sorts already, and the others are now on my TpT wish list! 🙂

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  2. By “sorts” do you mean just sorting things by attribute? I think I’m making this a harder concept than it’s supposed to be!!

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  3. I was tad confused too- However, I think these “sorts” are for example, an “addition” sort, would have e.g. 3 totals (say, 5, 8 and 10) and a pile of different addition sums – the student would need to sort the sums according to which “total” it fits into. 3+2, 1+4, 5+0 all sorted under the heading “5”, etc…

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  4. Great! 🙂

    Reply

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