Whether you are teaching Extended School Year services or taking the summer time to prep materials, I highly recommend investing in the Life Skills Units Community Bundle. This resource is so multi-faceted, differentiated, and chocked full of great info and activities. I cannot rave about it enough. The bundle is an awesome value because it brings together four great community settings into one resource: the mall, grocery store, park and restaurant. All of these places are essential skill building community settings. 

This summer, I am hitting so many academic, functional, and behavioral goals utilizing this resource. I’m going to walk you through the many ways that I use this bundle in my ESY classroom and throughout the year, highlighting TEN skills that can be easily addressed with this one resource! 

Picture Identification and Vocabulary Building 

So many of my students have vocabulary based IEP objectives. This bundle has incredible vocabulary banks for each community setting that it focuses. Great color drawings and definition matches keep students of all levels engaged. I like to use these cards for discrete trial training during 1:1 teacher time, but they could be used in so many different ways!

Matching Pictures 

Each community setting of the bundle has several opportunities for matching exact pictures. This type of activity is great for independent work. I like to laminate these pages and put them in a binder for repeated practice. There are so many different pages of this types of skill, students don’t get bored. 

Labeling Pictures

Easy to prep and use color pictures are ready for your students to label, again for a variety of settings. These pictures are simplified, but not babyish. They already have spaces to put the labels on theses images. They are important vocabulary for students of all ages to show mastery of. 

Sorting

If you don’t love sorting, are you even a sped teacher?!? There are so many types of sorting in this bundle. Sorting by association, sorting by function, sorting by types of objects, the list goes on. Once you have cut/laminated/velcroed your bundle, you have hours of functional sorting for your students. 

Meredith Walling

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