Math Curriculum Maps

Categories: Math | Resources

Last month, I shared my reading group curriculum maps. I finally finished my math group curriculum maps. Curriculum mapping is a great way plan out your students’ learning and progress on specific skills and concepts throughout the year. This works nicely with your students’ IEP goals since you can plan out each step in how they will meet their benchmarks. I do group curriculum maps as opposed to individual or classroom because my groups for reading and math are based on level.

While curriculum mapping my seem like the roof to an almost toppled over leaning tower of paperwork – I promise you – it’s worth the time. It makes lesson planning a breeze. Literally. No lies. You know I wouldn’t lie to you about time saving methods.

Here is the curriculum map for my high group. There are 6 kids in this group. Some of the math lessons will be done with all 6 but for computation skills they will be broken into two smaller groups. My major areas of focus for this group are computations, time, money, and measurement.

The Autism Helper - Math Curriculum Map

The Autism Helper - Math Curriculum Map

 

The middle group is still working on some more foundational skills. Check out their curriculum map:

The Autism Helper - Math Curriculum Map

The Autism Helper - Math Curriculum Map

My lowest groups curriculum maps aren’t done yet. With this group, we will be focusing on skills from the ABLLS. That will be coming soon 🙂

These curriculum map forms are available within my Ultimate Guided Reading Resource as an editable document. Math is not my favorite subject to teach but having a rough plan for the year like this has made it MUCH less intimidating. Any fellow math-avoiders out there?

15 Comments

  1. First, congratulations on your wedding! Hope your day was wonderful!

    Did you finish mapping your lowest groups? I’d be very interested in seeing them.

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  2. For our lowest math group – we have been working on skills from the ABLLS since these kids had so many areas of need. Some of them are math related but we are also incorporating receptive language building, visual perception, and fine motor skills.

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  3. I hate math, but reading some of your posts on it has been encouraging. Knowing that you hate it, but you’ve made it work gives me hope! I am splitting a class with another sped teacher, and so March will sort of feel like the beginning of the year. Do you have any thoughts on how I could test my students to see where I need to start with math? I googled math assessments, but I can’t really find what I am looking for. I am quite overwhelmed!

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  4. I bought the guided readin pack. Your post says here that you can edit curriculum maps to go with math. Do you have another version that is able to be edited. I only got a PDF option with purchase. I love the curriculum map and want to use it with math and reading.

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  5. You are so right. Thanks for catching that! I just emailed you my editable versions!

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  6. Do your groups use manipulatives? Do you advance them to the next level when they can do the task without manipulatives? I’m setting up distributed learning at home as the school has minimal, if any, experience with autism and they don’t know how to teach them. Thanks.

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  7. Yes – but I like to fade out manipulatives very quickly or fade to touch math so students aren’t reliant on the maniuplatives. Our students can get very quickly stuck on one method.

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  8. Hi Sasha!! First of all I have to remind you of how awesome you are!! Whenever I’m stuck on something or just need a good read I visit your blog. I love your work!! I was wondering what you use when determining students’ math goals and developing your curriculum maps. Do you have an example of a scope and sequence of functional math skills? Thanks!

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  9. Hi Sasha! I was wondering if I could get an editable copy of the curriculum maps. I love your guided reading set and I’d like to make a map for my math groups too. Keep up the great work

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  10. Thoughts on use of calculators? I see your notes about manipulatives, but was wondering your thoughts on calculator usage for students, i.e, none, minimal or as needed. Thanks! By the way, love your site! It has been most helpful with my first year in a 6th-8th grade MI/MO classroom.

    Reply
  11. I like the idea of calculators – especially for our older students. If you can teach a student to use a calculator, you give them the opportunity to accomplish aa wide range of math problems. If your students are struggling to master basic math facts, this may be the way to go!

    Reply
  12. Hi Sasha, I also purchased the guided reading pack and do not have the editable version for the curriculum maps.

    Reply
  13. Do you have any recommendations for curriculum to follow after completing Math Level 4?

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  14. Great question! Working on Level 5 but it’s a ways off. Can you use your school’s math curriculum?

    Reply

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