Match It! Interactive Tasks for Children with Autism

One of my first pieces of advice for new teachers or those “where the heck do I start???” emails – is keep those hands busy! Problem behaviors happen when your students are not engaged or doing something. I recommend making a lot of easy tasks to occupy your kiddos the first few weeks. If you have a brand new, full class of kids – you will need to keep some kids working while you assess and teach your other students the schedules, rotations, new tasks, etc. Basically – you need some independent work tasks. Some that can be accomplished by your students on their own but is also meaningful. You want these work tasks to still practice previously mastered skills and concepts.

I have gotten a ton of emails and comments based on this post – Homework and Independent Work for Nonreaders. A lot of the tasks in this product – Match It! Interactive Tasks for Children with Autism – are based on some of these ideas. I keep these matching pages in my students’ morning binder and language binder. These tasks are perfect for down time, the few extra minutes before you transition, or the first few minutes of an activity so you can get your materials set up. Grab this “back to school essential” resource for 28% off TODAY. Last day of the big Back to School Sale! Use coupon code BTS13 to stock up.

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Here’s what is included:

The Autism Helper - Match It!

The Autism Helper - Match It!

The Autism Helper - Match It!
The Autism Helper - Match It!

And, of course, here is the video product preview for Match It! Interactive Tasks:

 

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4 Comments

  1. Thank you!I just laminated and put these together. They are great!!!

    Reply
  2. Sorting objects into two piles made an amazing difference for my son. I don’t think he was capable of categorizing what he saw, so the whole world was confusing because it was filled with all unique objects. I think that his categorizing ability was formed by this exercise, and allowed him to think more clearly. He sorted all kinds of things into 2 piles, for example 3 spoons and 3 forks would be put in one pile and he would have to sort them into 2 piles. It also worked with pictures from magazines etc. For example, pictures of 3 boys and 3 girls would be sorted into 2 piles.

    Reply
  3. Awesome to hear 🙂

    Reply
  4. Thanks for the great idea!

    Reply

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