To say that there are common IEP goals I use often in Early Childhood seems a bit taboo because well, IEP goals are to be individualized, hence the name.  However, if we think about what is needed to function in school there are some goals that most young children do not yet have developmentally when they come to us.  When a child find referral or Infants and Toddler transitioning prior to 3 kiddo comes my way, there are several goals I often use because they are what kids need for a strong foundation. 

Social Foundations

In my opinion, this is one of the most important areas of focus.  If a child does not know how to function socially/emotionally, navigate a space, have work stamina, follow a routine, acquire social behaviors, play/work with peers, etc, acquiring more foundational, academic based standards are just not going to happen smoothly.  So, when you look at a developmental assessment or you conduct one yourself and you see low scores in transitioning, following a routine, peer play etc, here are some goals that stretch far and really tackle more than just one skill.  They include following directions (aka a schedule), play initiation, and transitioning.  If your student master these goals think about all the things they will be able to do: follow class directions, navigate a space, sit or remain in a designated area (ie: circle time, work with teacher table), communicate with peers, play skills improve and so much more!    *not all goals are shown with objectives*

Social Foundations IEP Goal Samples:

By June 2020,  in a familiar setting (e.g. centers, playground), during free play time with preferred peers, after a teacher, assistant or friend demonstrates 2 play initiation action (e.g. verbal) and prompts the child to repeat it, Gina will repeat the demonstrated action 2 times within a 30-minute play session, for 4 out 5 play opportunities.

By 12/3/2020, in a familiar setting (e.g. classroom centers, playground), during free play time with preferred peers, after a teacher demonstration , Gina will make 1 verbal or nonverbal invitation to play with a peer within a 30-minute play session, for 4 out of 5 play opportunities.

(Play initiation: ie: (1) Student approaches a preferred peer and asks or gestures, “Want play?”. (2) Teacher picks up block, hands to child, then says, “Now go give the block to Chris”)

By 6/6/2019, when the class transitions into a whole-class or small group activity (e.g. read aloud, snack, circle time), Gina will use sensory supports, either during sensory breaks or integrated into the activity, to physically join her peers and follow prescribed rules (e.g. Sit down within acceptable area, keep hands and feet to oneself, maintain reasonable voice volume) without maladaptive behaviors (e.g. Crying, foot stamping, yelling) for at least 30 minutes during 4 out of 5 whole-class activities.

By 12/3/2020, Gina will follow the class routine/schedule and teacher directions using a visual schedule and other visuals with a maximum of 2 teacher verbal prompts in 4 out of 5 schedule opportunities. (Ie: Gina will be able to transition from breakfast, circle time, work with teacher and centers with a max of 2 verbal prompt reminders).

Cognitive

I personally use the DAYC-2 when I test children.   I also like to think about the learning progressions in the Early Learning Assessment and the Assessment of Basic Language and Learner Skills.  Regardless of what you use, there are basic learner skills that are needed before children can obtain higher, more academic based skills such as letter and number acquisition.  Skills such as visual discrimination: being able to match an object to a picture, pictures to pictures, non-identical pictures to pictures and so on.  We also need to think about being able to label nouns by touching and matching before possibly verbalizing sound approximations or whole words.  Did I forget to mention that most of my kiddos are coming in with little, to no functional language (YET!)?  How are they supposed to tell you what character they see in a book if they haven’t mastered those important basic learner skills yet?

Cognitive IEP Goal Samples:

By 12/3/2020, Gina will see a picture of a noun and say the correct label in 4 out of 5 trials.

For example:

Teacher shows a card with a picture of a noun (ie: apple), Gina says apple.

Objective 1

Gina will see an array of three noun pictures (ie: apple, ball, chair), hear the targeted noun (ie: ball), and match targeted noun object to picture.

Example:

Teacher sets out a picture of an apple, ball, and chair.

Teacher says “ball” (targeted noun)
Gina matches the targeted noun object to the picture…

Objective 2

Gina will see an array of three noun pictures (ie: apple, ball, chair), hear the targeted noun (ie: ball), and match the targeted noun picture to picture.

Example:

Teacher sets out a picture of an apple, ball, and chair.

Teacher says “ball” (targeted noun)
Gina matches the noun picture to picture

Objective 3

Gina will see an array of three noun pictures (ie: apple, ball, chair), hear the targeted noun (ie: ball), and touch targeted noun picture.

Example:

Teacher sets out a picture of an apple, ball, and chair.

Teacher says “ball” (targeted noun)
Gina touches the targeted noun picture

Objective 4

Gina will see a picture of a targeted noun and say the noun or sound approximation.

Example:

Teacher sets out a picture of an apple.
Gina says “apple” or “ah”

By 6/2020 after listening to a short story in a small group, Gina will respond to 5 questions by selecting a picture card that shows the correct information related to characters and major events of the story, scoring 5 out of 5, during 4 of 5 trials, as measured by teacher-charted records.

*This is a higher wh- question type skill goal!

By 12/20/2020, given 4 different shapes (circle, square, triangle, and rectangle), Gina will expand her ability to match, identify, and sort the shape to its matching shape manipulative, scoring 4 out of 4 correctly sorted, for 4 out of 5 trials.

Objective 1

Gina will match shape objects (circle, triangle, rectangle, square) to identical corresponding pictures of the shape.

Objective 2

Gina will match identical pictures of shapes (circle, triangle, square, rectangle).

Objective 3

Gina will sort two different types of shapes into two categories provided with a teacher model (ie: triangles and squares).

Objective 4

Gina will sort 4 categories of shapes using objects: triangles, circles, squares, and rectangles.

When working on goals, you target what is written however, you want to continuously expand.  For example, even with my math shape goal, while it’s a matching and sorting goal, I would have the child also work on expressively or receptively identifying the shape.  We would highlight it during circle time and as we walk around the classroom and play in centers.  My “see, touch, say” noun program works on labeling, expressive language, and basic learner visual discrimination skills.

It is so important to remember that these goals do not need to be targeted always sitting at a work with teacher table.  Join your kids in the math center and lay on the carpet modeling shape matching and turn it into a game.  Count the kids in circle time.  Have a student come up and touch the apple in your mystery ABC letter box.  Gravitate towards the dollhouse that Gina always seems to play with and take another peer with you to help aide in peer play initiations and exchanges.  Model core language everywhere and on the playground as the kids ask for “more” push and “go go go down the slide”.  There are so many opportunities to work on goals without it being a structured lesson. While there is time for that, use the set up of your classroom to your advantage!   Happy Goal Setting!

Stay Informed

Sign up to receive our latest news and announcements

Pin It on Pinterest