Basic Receptive Language Worksheets {freebies}

Categories: Resources

Happy Friday! I have a great freebie for you this lovely end of the workweek. My speech pathologist starting doing this activities with some of my students with emerging language skills and I loved it! This is such an easy and effective way to target receptive language, following multiple step directions, vocabulary, and colors. These can be hard skill to target for some of our lower level learners.

So the worksheet looks really basic – but I love how it’s separated into small groups of items. We even covered up the other rows for some students to limit the visual stimuli present. You can easily make this harder or easier. You present the worksheet to the student and then present simple directions. Again you can adjust the level of difficulty easily. We started with basic commands like, “color the hat” or “circle the boots.” Then we made it more difficult “color the mittens green” or “color the scarf yellow.”

IMG_3075

My kids really liked this and it was simple enough for my lower level learners. I will definitely be making more of these to work on seasonal vocabulary!

IMG_3077

 

Here are your freebies: Winter Clothes and Receptive Language Worksheet

 

For other ideas for students with emerging verbal skills – check out this post on evoking expressive language, this post on literacy for nonreaders, and this post on graphing for nonverbal students.

 

4 Comments

  1. Thanks for sharing the freebies! I am going to have to do this with my little ones. I was wondering how you like the ABLLS. We are looking into possibly changing our assessment program and this is one of our options. Do you know if ABLLS is changing anything to align with Common Core?
    Kate

    Reply
  2. I love the ABLLS, Kate! It’s perfect for my low level learners and helps me develop goals and identify areas of need for basic skills. I don’t think it will be changed for common core because it’s not a “state standard” based assessment. The ABLLS was developed based skills presented by typical functioning preschoolers. I have a post two or three weeks ago about the ABLlS that may give you more insight! 🙂 hope this helps

    Reply
  3. I’ve followed your blog for a while now, and am learning a great deal–thanks for all the insites!! I have a few questions for you if you don’t mind….You’ve mentioned activities done in conjunction with your speech/language pathologist…how often does she come into your room to do activities? how often does she see your kids individually? do your kids also go into a regular education classroom for parts of the day? if so, who sets up the activities that are done in the regular ed classroom?

    Reply
  4. Thank you so much for reading! I appreciate it! My speech therapist comes in my room about 3 times a week (she sees each student between 30-45 minutes a week – mostly in groups). The kids that require the most attention she sees one on one (but still in my room) and she sees one students at lunch once a week. The rest of the kids she sees in small groups based on similar goals/abilities. My students are included in the regular education for specials (music, gym, etc.) as well as special events such as DARE, art lessons, etc. The students I have right now are not included in the general education for academics. Since I have 5-8th graders, that academic gap seems to get really big around late elementary so unfortunately inclusion is only for social skills right now. In the past I have collaborated with gen ed teacher for academic tasks. Hope this helps 🙂

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest