One Week Data Sheet

Categories: Data

I’m always trying to make my data systems better and more efficient. I know. Overachiever. But why be happy with the status quo when you can amp it up and leave that crusty ole status quo out in the dumpster? The problem was my amazing and glorious one on one for one my tricky kids was slacking in the data department. Now – let me clarify. I love this woman. Love this woman sometimes little bit more than my husband. Her positive attitude, ability to think on her feat, and near perfection and implementing the behavior plan blows me away on a daily basis. But the data…

To her credit, the child she works with is very challenging so taking data on IEP goals is not always easy. It occurred to me that the system we had me be too much clunk and paperwork. I decided to compress and reorganize and make the data process as streamlined as possible!

The result is kind of beautiful – if I do say so myself. One page. One clipboard. Our trusty counter right on top. Done and done. There is enough space for each day for each IEP goal we are currently tracking and the behavior data all at the bottom.

The Autism Helper - Data Sheet

Here is a more filled out version:

The Autism Helper - Data Sheet

I like that I can “set it up” for her and get the dates ready and stimuli if need be. Staff Management Tip: This was a great, non-confrontational way of address the data taking issue. Since we are staring a new system, we got to re-do some training, review importance of data, etc. And the new data sheet was the excuse versus the lack of data we have been collecting lately. For all those confrontation avoiders like me 🙂

The Autism Helper - Data Sheet

What is that counter you ask? Only the best 2 bucks I’ve spent from amazon. You click each time a behavior occurs. It’s easy, discrete, and is perfect for high frequency behaviors. For this guy we are currently tracking screams and some days we are well over 50+. We click each time the scream happens and jot it down at the end of the day.

The Autism Helper - Data Sheet
Download this data sheet for free here: One Week Data Sheet. It’s a powerpoint so you can customize for your students’ goals 🙂

18 Comments

  1. This is perfect. I just spent the weekend trying to update program sheets/binders for new IEP goals. And I got a baseball counter that can track 2 types of behaviors on the same unit. I have had a student who had a keychain of 3 different clickers for tracking frequent behaviors.

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  2. I have a student that screams as well, but struggle to find a clear operational definition for all of us that work with him to be taking consistent data on. Have you been able to find one for your student? My student is also very loud in general, so differentiating between yelling, angry screams, happy singing that he does very loudly, etc. is something I’m trying to look at as well.

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  3. Thanks Sasha! I love data sheets!
    Bonnie- where do you find 2 type and the keychain clickers???
    Thanks!

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  4. Love that!

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  5. Screaming can be really hard to operationally define. We do a lot of in-situ staff training on what counts as a scream and what doesn’t. For some students I have used a timer to track total minutes screaming in a time period – which can easier. Click the timer on when he starts screaming and off when screaming ends – then we right the total amount every hour or half hour. Also – you could look at taking data by interval. So break the day into small intervals (1 min, 5 min, etc.) and check if the student screamed at all during the interval. Then for each day calculate how many intervals screaming occurred – so student screamed at some point during 80% of 1 intervals. Hope that helps 🙂

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  6. LOVE THIS SO MUCH! Thanks for sharing 🙂

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  7. Thank you thank you!!!

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  8. This is so great! Thank You!! I have a student who starts to cry and yell during lunch recess, in the last week it has continued into the class and then he gets very loud, and aggressive (flipping tables, trying to bite,hitting me and other staff)…I am trying an arsenal of things ….I believe he simply wants to go home… I am trying to make coming back to class after recess FUN but so far this only works for a few minutes….yesterday he was yelling and crying off and on for one and a half hours!…..

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  9. Thanks for reading 🙂

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  10. Ugh! Hang in there! Recess is SO hard for some kids. Have you tried a timer or countdown so can anticipate when the transition is starting?

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  11. Hi Sasha,

    I love how you are always updating your data collection procedures. I actually used one of your models and was able to compress many of my student’s IEP goal data onto one paper for the month! It looks very similar to this weekly sheet but works for the whole month. I found my paraprofessionals were becoming too overwhelmed with the daily or weekly change out and organization of data paperwork. Of course, I still find myself making corrections on each student’s sheet to fit their needs and mine but overall it has made a huge difference in my ability to manage data. Anyways, just wanted to pop in and say thank you! You’ve made a big difference in my life as a teacher 🙂

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  12. I’d love to see what you have put together. Maybe it will help with my own classroom challenges. kathy_musgrove@hotmail.com

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  13. Thanks SO much for this sweet comment! I am so glad these resources have been helpful for you. Yes – those simple data sheets can be immensely helpful. Glad you found a system that works!! 🙂

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  14. How do I get a blank copy of this amazing form???

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  15. The link is in the end of the post! 🙂 Enjoy!

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  16. Hi Sasha,
    Quick question, how would you use this sheet to track multiple behaviors? Since you’re using the clicker do you choose one behavior per day to track? I see on one of the example sheets you have three behaviors listed.

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  17. Great question! A few options: have multiple clickers and use one for each behavior. A school I consult at now, we set up a para with three color coded clickers (added washi tape) for each behavior – it works super well. Another option is that possibly not all 3 behaviors are of super high frequency. Use the clicker for high frequency behaviors and just simple tally mark data for other less frequent behaviors. If you switch off which data you are taking each day, be sure to put n/a on the days you aren’t taking data on that behavior so you don’t accidentally think the level is 0 that day (I could see myself doing that on accident!).

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