Room on the Broom by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler is such a great book and I like to read it around this time of year since it’s about a witch.  It’s a cute story and the pictures in this book are amazing.  It’s a good book to work on sequencing and answering “wh” questions.  I created some visuals to pair with the book along with book questions.  Click here for a Free Copy of this resource – Room on the Broom

You can use the book pictures while you are reading the story.  I laminate, cut, and put soft Velcro on the back of all the book pictures.  Then I put a piece of hard Velcro in the book so the student can put the picture in the book while you are reading the story.  Once you read through the book you can see where to match up the book pictures in the book.

There are four different animals who ride on the witch’s broom so you can really work on those sequential concepts as each animal joins on the broom.  First the cat is on the broom.  Then witch’s hat blows off so the witch and the cat have to go look for the hat!

I like to ask lots of “Wh” questions throughout this book.  At the beginning I ask “what fell off the witch?”, “why did the witch’s hat fall off?” and “who finds the witch’s hat?”

Second the dog rides on the witch’s broom.  The story continues and you can keep working on answering those “who” questions and sequencing the animals as they join onto the broom.  After the dog joins, the witch’s bow blow off her braid and now they need to go down again to look for the bow.

After the bird and the frog join on the broom the broom breaks!!!!  The kids think this part is so funny.

There are so good new vocabulary terms I worked on with my students while reading this book.  For example, when the animals get all muddy and are disguised as a scary beast we talked about what “disguised” means.  You can also talk about rhyming words and make a list of rhyming words from the book.

 

You can practice sequencing and answering “Who” questions again as all four animals add something to the witch’s cauldron!  Lots for opportunities to ask “who” questions – “who put something in the cauldron first?”, “who added the pine cone?”, or “who went last?”

A film was created based on this book and it was nominated for the Best Animated Short Film at the 2014 Academy Awards.  So after you read the book you can watch the cartoon of the book on YouTube with the link – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyWkk0GFt2k

Sarah Gast
Sarah Gast

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