The Autism Helper Classroom: Room Layout Diagram

Sometimes the whole room layout is hard to envision. Like I say all the time, I am a visual leaner, just like my kiddos. Even with pictures and videos getting the feel for exactly how the furniture are organized is tricky. I made a room layout diagram to illustrate how my furniture is arranged within my classroom. There is a method to the madness. The physical structure of your classroom is important. Having a classroom that is visually defined and visually defined is essential for children with autism. Check out the Seven Steps posts on classroom structure: Why Structure is Important; Classroom Structure Considerations; Visually Divided & Defined; Structure in Inclusion; and Making Structure Work.

I have a TON of furniture in my room. In order to create physically separate centers, I use desks, shelves, and dividers to structure my class. My advice – hoard around your school. Snag old teacher desks, unwanted shelves, student desks – whatever! You need a lot of furniture in order to provide physical structure in your class.

 

Here is my classroom’s layout:

The Autism Helper - Room Diagram

Here is how we use the classroom:

The Autism Helper - Room Diagram

If these are hard to see – you can download both diagrams as PDFs: Room Layout Diagrams.

7 Comments

  1. I love your site! I am new to teaching students with ASD and I’m wondering what program you used to create your classroom layouts. All the programs I have seen have been limited and I want to label specifically for my classroom.

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  2. Where do the kids go during down time???

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  3. There is a break area (play area – but since this classroom is older we call it break area) in the lower right hand corner.

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  4. I’m moving from a mostly ID class to an ASD for next school year. In my ID class, I did away with the rows of student desks and used small group tables and rotating centers. I started setting up my new classroom and a well-meaning, veteran teacher freaked out when I didn’t have the rows of student desks. She said the students needed their own individual space. I noticed you don’t use the rows of desks either. Did your students resist not having an individual space?

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  5. Hi Kelly, I have worked in many, many classrooms where students didn’t have their own desk with no issues. When you think about why a student would need their individual space – think about maybe what that would mean – maybe a place to keep supplies, communication book, a place to go to when feeling overwhelmed, etc. – I think you can easily accomplish all of this in other ways in the class!

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  6. Hi Sasha! Do you still set up your room this way or have you made any changes over the years?

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  7. When I was in the classroom, I usually made changes every year depending on the group I had!

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